Elf

To me, Elf (2003) is up there with Home Alone (1990), Miracle on 34th Street (1947) and The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992) as one of the greatest Christmas films ever made, but watching it on Christmas Day whilst in New York made me appreciate it even more. As a great man once said: “New York I love you, but you’re bringing me down.”

Photo credit: Warner Bros
Photo credit: Warner Bros (2003)

Continue reading “Elf”

Advertisements

Melancholia

Melancholia
Photo credit: Christian Geisnaes (2011)

Melancholia (2011) opens up with a beautifully crafted prologue featuring some stunning abstract imagery, soundtracked by Richard Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde. This use of orchestral music is reminiscent of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), which featured music by Richard Strauss; a composer who was greatly influenced by Wagner. The links between these musical choices could be interpreted as a playful homage to the sci-fi genre.

Continue reading “Melancholia”

The Wild Bunch

Ordinarily, I’m not a huge fan of Westerns, but The Wild Bunch (1969) isn’t any old Western. It pushed the boundaries of the genre and played with the audience’s expectations of what they’d see in a Western. As a result, the film and its director, Sam Peckinpah, have unsurprisingly become pretty influential on the next generation of moviemakers.

Photo credit: Amazon
Image credit: IMDB (1990)

For example, Hurt Locker (2008) director Kathryn Bigelow has been heavily influenced by Peckinpah. Pramaggiore and Wallis (2011) discuss how Hurt Locker “incorporates the visual strategies and thematic ideas” of Peckinpah’s “gracefully choreographed and violently bloody Westerns.” They also point out that Bigelow isn’t shy in acknowledging her appreciation of Peckinpah either: “in 2010 she introduced The Wild Bunch for the ‘Films That Inspired Me’ series at Hammer Museum in Lost Angeles.” Unsurprisingly, Peckinpah has a few other fans in the directing world too:

Continue reading “The Wild Bunch”

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑